Gather Data

Choosing what to observe

– teacher or student movement or interactions (see samples), assignments, media use, etc

There are innumerable aspects of teaching/learning that can provide rich data. It can involve the student teacher, one or more students and their movement and interaction, questioning technique, speech patterns, or a review of lessons, assessments, media use, timing, and more. There are examples data samples that will give you some ideas for data gathering. Bear in mind that these are a few samples and they may not represent what you need. Feel free to design your own plan.

The first priority is to understand the nature of the lesson or activity and then decide what might be good to observe. The student teacher has to be the one initiating the discussion on collecting data and should make the final choice about what to observe in consultation with the supervisor.

When the student teacher makes the decisions they will take responsibility for the decisions and their consequences. They will also learn that this is a process that they should continue throughout their teaching careers. They will learn to take responsibility for the teaching and learning process in their classroom and will not have to wait for someone else to tell them what to do or how to think about fixing issues that arise.

Data samples (on the right) - explore the data samples and while you are free to choose from these, do not let them limit what you need to do. You can create your own data gathering plan so you collect information that is relevant to your situation.

The first priority is to understand the nature of the lesson or activity and then decide what might be good to observe. The student teacher has to be the one initiating the discussion on collecting data and should make the final choice about what to observe in consultation with the supervisor.

Student Movement

Student movement

Teacher Interaction

interaction

When the student teacher makes the decisions they will take responsibility for the decisions and their consequences. They will also learn that this is a process that they should continue throughout their teaching careers. They will learn to take responsibility for the teaching and learning process in their classroom and will not have to wait for someone else to tell them what to do or how to think about fixing issues that arise.

Data samples (linked) - explore the data samples and while you are free to choose from these, do not let them limit what you need to do. You can create your own data gathering plan so you collect information that is relevant to your situation.

Observation and collecting data

Do as much setup as you can prior to the observation. Create the seating chart or activity layout and enter the pertinent information such as date, location, type in any pertinent class info, and names that need to be entered. Don’t forget that you can record audio, video and take pictures (be aware of privacy and safety policies). 

Once that is all set to go, you only need to start the timer and begin collecting the data. Add comments where needed as the lesson progresses.

 

 

Teacher Movement

TEacher movement

Sharing data

Click on the link for more detailed information. The sharing process should begin with the student teacher and it is extremely important for the supervisor to remain non-judgmental (linked) during the self-analysis process:

  1. Discussing the lesson/working time focusing on the strengths of the lesson or activity and then talking about how the lesson could be improved.

You might write this in chart format:

    Went Well   ||   Would Reconsider

  1. Then the student teacher should ask for the data that has been collected on their behalf and begin to analyze that data.

The difficult part initially for the supervisor is to not interfere with the self-analysis and just letting the student teacher lead on this. Learning to wait with your comments and advice is hard, but absolutely necessary if the student teacher is going to take ownership of their learning process. The hope is that the student teacher will cover the essential points in the self-analysis process.

After the self-analysis the student teacher should ask for the supervisor’s thoughts and they should discuss recommendations for future growth.

The initiation and self-analysis process does not guarantee success. Some student teachers will have difficulty with self-analysis and some supervisors will find it difficult to relinquish some control of the evaluation process. If there is considerable difference of opinion between them over time then a different process will have to begin. However, the accumulated data that has been gathered should be useful in resolving differences.

Setting goals for further growth and observation

The student teacher should be allowed, in consultation with the supervisor to set future growth goals. This may be overwhelming for many student teachers and they should be encouraged to look at the examples that are available.

Once goals are settled, a timeline for next observing them should be set.

 

Question Types

 

Management Comments

management comments

 

Class Layout

start